How to Get Your Period Back

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Trying to get pregnant when you have no period is pretty difficult, no matter how you approach it. Getting pregnant is not always the easy task that the movies and tv shows want us to think it is.

not having a period is quite possible that you are not ovulating

If you are not having a period, it is quite possible that you are not ovulating either, and if you are not ovulating, you are definitely not going to be able to get pregnant. A healthy, full cycle is one of the best things to have if you want to get pregnant, and today we are going to focus on what to do if you need to get your period back to normal and back on track.

1. Reasons For Absent Period

When you do not have a period for awhile, that is known as amenorrhea, or absence of period. Amenorrhea is actually divided into two different types: primary and secondary. Primary amenorrhea is when a girl of at least age 16 has not gotten her menstrual cycle yet, for the first (or primary) time.

when you do not have a period for awhile, that is known as amenorrhea

Secondary amenorrhea is the most common type. It refers to when a woman who has previously had a period before but now has had no period for at least 6 months. Secondary amenorrhea can occur for many different reasons.

2. Bad Nutrition

When you are not getting the proper amounts of nutrients in your body, this can result in many different health problems. Amenorrhea is one of the issues that can come about as a result of nutritional deficiencies. Many women do not realize that getting the proper nutrition is very, very important and that literally every body process is regulated by nutrition.

when you are not getting the proper amounts of nutrients in your body

Most women also do not realize that nutrition plays such an important role in menstruation. Improving your diet and healthy more whole, nutritious foods is one of the most important things that women can do to regulate their menstrual cycle and bring back their period.

3. Weight Issues

Another thing that many women do not understand is just how pivotal a role weight plays in menstruation and the menstrual cycle. If you are overweight or underweight, either one of these can affect your period. Women who are overweight are likely to have too much estrogen due to higher than normal amounts of body fat.

how pivotal a role weight plays in menstruation

Women who are underweight on the other hand might have amenorrhea or anovulation as a result of too little body fat. Keeping your weight at an ideal level is one of the best things you can do to keep your cycle normal.

4. Stress

We all know that stress plays a vital role in all body processes. When you are too stressed, it can affect your health in all sorts of different ways. When stress hormones, like cortisol and adrenaline are released, it wreaks havoc with the fertility hormones and makes it harder for the menstrual cycle to regulate itself. Keeping stress under control will go a long way towards improving fertility and regulating the menstrual cycle as well.

we all know that stress plays a vital role in all body processes

5. Health Problems

There are also many different health problems that can wreak havoc on the menstrual cycle. For example, thyroid issues are one of the most common female health problems and they almost always interfere with the menstrual cycle.

PCOS is another common disorder that can cause the period to stop

PCOS is another common disorder that can cause the period to stop, as can premature ovarian failure and perimenopause. If you think that a health disorder could be to blame for your menstrual cycle problems, make an appointment and see doctor right away so that you can get help.

How to Get Your Period Back, 5.0 out of 5 based on 1 rating

Dr. Karen Leham, MD

Dr. Karen Leham is double board-certified in Obstetrics and Gynecology and in Reproductive Endocronology and Infertility. Dr. Leham completed her residency at Loyola University, followed by a fellowship at UCLA.